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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

1 edition of brief account of Shaker and Shakerism found in the catalog.

brief account of Shaker and Shakerism

brief account of Shaker and Shakerism

several pages of Shaker music are also added which have never before been published.

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Published by Printed in Shaker Village in Canterbury [N.H.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Shakers -- History.,
  • Shakers -- Doctrines.

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsMacLean, J. P. 1848-1939, former owner., Shaker Collection (Library of Congress)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBX9765 .B75 1850
    The Physical Object
    Pagination16 p. :
    Number of Pages16
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL487187M
    LC Control Number98216856

    The Kentucky revival, or, A short history of the late extraordinary out-pouring of the spirit of God, in the western states of America, agreeably to Scripture promises and prophecies, concerning the latter day: with a brief account of the entrance and progress of what the world call Shakerism, among the subjects of the late revival in Ohio and Kentucky, presented to the true Zion-traveller.   Title: Shakerism unmasked, or, The history of the : William J HaskettPublisher: Gale, Sabin Americana Description: Based on Joseph Sabin's famed bibliography, Bibliotheca Americana, Sabin Americana, contains a collection of books, pamphlets, serials and other works about the Americas, from the time of their Author: William J Haskett.

    Get this from a library! The Shaker herb and garden book. [Rita Buchanan; Hancock Shaker Village.] -- In a brief history, Buchanan posits that to many people, Shaker refers to a style of furniture, but that Shakerism was first a religion and then a way of life. The Shakers were especially successful.   Museum President David Stocks narrates an introductory to the North Family, one of eight groups of Shakers who lived and worked together at the Mount Lebanon Shaker Village from

    Richard McNemar (20 November – 15 September ) was a Presbyterian-turned-Shaker preacher, revivalist preacher, writer, and a historian of the early nineteenth century. He published the Shakers’ first printed bound book and is considered by historians as the father of Shaker literature. He started the Shaker colonies of Union Village Shaker settlement in Ohio and Shaker village of. The Shaker Experience in America by Stephen J. Stein The American Soul Rediscovering the Wisdom of the Founders by Jacob Needleman Shakers Compendium of the origin, History, principles, Rules and Regulations, Government, and Doctrines of the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing with Biographies of Ann Lee, William Lee, Jas.


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Brief account of Shaker and Shakerism Download PDF EPUB FB2

The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, more commonly known as the Shakers, are a millenarian nontrinitarian restorationist Christian sect founded circa in England and then organized in the United States in the s.

They were initially known as "Shaking Quakers" because of their ecstatic behavior during worship services. Espousing egalitarian ideals, women took. The Shakers are a nearly-defunct religious organization whose formal name is the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second group grew out of a branch of Quakerism founded in England in by Jane and James Wardley.

Shakerism combined aspects of Quaker, French Camisard, and millennial beliefs and practices, along with the revelations of visionary Ann Lee. Stephen J. Stein, The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers. Described as the “definitive history” of the people known as the “United Society of Believers in the First and Second Coming of Christ”-the Shakers, this work has stood the test of time.

Stein, a professor at Indiana University, systematically covers brief account of Shaker and Shakerism book full range of Shaker. A brief account of Shakers and Shakerism: several pages of Shaker music are also added which have never before been published.

(Canterbury, N.H.: Printed in Shaker Village, [?]), by Shakers (page images at HathiTrust) A brief account of Shaker and Shakerism: several pages of Shaker music are also added which have never before been published.

The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, commonly known as the Shakers, followed Mother Ann Lee to the United States in when life in England became difficult. In the United States, they established several colonies whose governing principals included celibacy and agrarian communal living.

Even at its peak, however, Shakerism claimed only about 4, members. Mary Marshall Dyer (–), was a voice for the largely forgotten anti-Shakerism sentiment in rural New she joined the Shakers of Enfield, New ointed in her lack of a leadership role and frustrated by the constraints of Shaker life, Dyer left the community in MacLean, J.P.

Shaker lit. The Kentucky revival, or, A short history of the late extraordinary outpouring of the spirit of God in the western states of America: agreeably to Scripture promises and prophecies concerning the latter day: with a brief account of the entrance and progress of what the world call Shakerism among the subjects of the late revival in Ohio and Kentucky: presented to.

This book and its author, Elder Richard McNemar, are significant to the history of the Shakers. Four or five editions of the book were published by the Shakers prior to the Civil War and McNemar has been the subject of two biographical works: A Sketch of the Life and Labors of Richard McNemar (), by John Patterson McLean, and Richard the Shaker () by [ ].

CONTENTS Benjamin Green, 1})e True Believer's Vademecum, or, Shakerism Exposed () 1 John McBride, An Account of the Doctrines, Government, Manners and Customs of the Shakers with Remarks on Confession to Catholic Priests and Shaker Elders () 43 Charles C.

Hodgdon, fust Published, Hodgdon's Life and Manner of Living Among the Shakers () Shakers. ETHNONYM: Believers. The Shakers (the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing) are a religious sect that began as an off-shoot of Protestantism in England in the mids.

Escaping persecution, the Shaker's founder, Mother Ann Lee, and eight followers immigrated to the United States in and settled in Watervliet, New York, north of Albany. The novel also refers many times to "The Book of Shaker." The implication being that it is the holy book of the Shaker people.

At one point when Rob asks his father if he believes all the Shaker laws, his father replies, "Most. I'm glad it's all writ down in the Book of Shaker" (p. 32). The only problem with this statement is that there is no. Books shelved as shakers: A Simple Murder by Eleanor Kuhns, The Outsider by Ann H.

Gabhart, The Visionist by Rachel Urquhart, Like the Willow Tree: The D. Periodicals: The Shaker and Shakeress (published under four different names) offers an important source of articles on late nineteenth-century Shakerism.

The Shaker Quarterly (edited and published by the Sabbathday Lake Shakers) provides numerous articles on all aspects of Shaker history & belief by scholars and Shaker authors. Page - I am with you saith the LORD of hosts- According to the word that I covenanted with you, when ye came out of Egypt, so my spirit remaineth among you, fear ye not.

For thus saith the LORD of hosts, yet once, it is a little while, and I will shake the heavens. Although the Shakers have largely disappeared, the Shaker way of life remains part of the American scene, primarily through Shaker museums, restored Shaker communities open to tourists, Shaker manufactures such as chairs and oval boxes which command prices of over $, in the antiquities market, and Shaker songs such as "The Gift to Be Simple.".

Shakerism was founded by an illiterate English factory worker named Ann Lee. Guided by divine visions and signs, she and eight pilgrims came to America in to spread her gospel in the New World. The Shaker village at Sabbathday Lake in New Gloucester, Maine, has been in operation sincewhen it was founded by a group of Shaker missionaries.

The United Society of. The Kentucky revival, or, A short history of the late extraordinary out-pouring of the spirit of God, in the western states of America agreeably to Scripture promises and prophecies, concerning the latter day: with a brief account of the entrance and progress of what the world call Shakerism, among the subjects of the late revival in Ohio and Kentucky, presented to the true Zion-traveller, as.

III.—THE ORDER OF LIFE AMONG THE SHAKERS. A Shaker Society consists of two classes or orders: the Novitiate and the Church Order. There is a general similarity in the life of these two; but to the Novitiate families are sent all applicants for admission to the community or Church, and here they are trained; and the elders of these families also receive inquiring strangers, and stand in.

A brief account of Shaker and Shakerism: several pages of Shaker music are also added which have never before been published. By Shakers. and Shaker Collection (Library of Congress) DLC. Abstract. Music on verso of each leaf and on p. [4] of of access: Internet. Buy a cheap copy of The Shakers: Two Centuries of Spiritual book.

The Shaker tradition, from its origin in late eighteenth-century England to its flowering in nineteenth-century America, long has been of interest to students of Free shipping over $The following reading list of books and publications includes books that are out of print and only available through public libraries.

Books marked with an asterisk (*) are available for sale at the Hancock Shaker Village Museum Store. Books can be purchased at the store, or ordered via phone at ()ext. High School.The Shaker “families” would range in size from 50 to people.

At Watervliet the building of both a new dwelling house and a new meeting house in was made necessary by the great “ingathering” or influx of new members that occurred from that time untilcausing the enlargement of established communities and the creation of.